Aging in Community

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau asks us to rethink “aging in place.”  The bureau suggests we consider smaller living spaces with lower maintenance costs.

Read this article for some clear thinking about aging in community. They warn seniors about reverse mortgage companies that prey on natural fears of change, and fear of moving to a new home. Reverse mortgages are financially risky and fraught with danger.

Put a tiny house in your family’s backyard

If your grown children or relatives own a home in California, new legislation makes it easier for them to put a “tiny house” for you in their backyard.

Tiny houses, granny units, in-law units, these are all allowed under legislation that took effect January 1, 2017.

This “East Bay Smart Senior” article writes about tiny houses and other options for aging in community.

Richmond experiments with tiny houses

Richmond, California, has a pilot program to build 6 tiny houses on wheels. Volunteers are building the houses with money raised through donations. The houses will be for people who are experiencing homelessness.

Tiny houses can be located in any Richmond area where residential uses are allowed. The city will not require special permits for these houses. Read the news in the Richmond Pulse.

New, low-income rentals in Oakland

There are now openings for low-income seniors to rent apartments in Oakland.

Glen Brook Terrace, a 66-unit mid-rise senior community, was built in 1969 and refurbished 4 years ago. The location is Panama Avenue, near Kaiser Permanente Hospital.

Applications are due August 17th. If you need assistance with the application, visit your local library. Or, call DayBreak and ask for an introduction to a volunteer or social worker who can help you with the application. Call DayBreak at (510) 834-8314.

Visit the Satellite Affordable Housing Association website for information on how to apply for Glen Brook Terrace or other low-income housing as it becomes available in the Bay Area.